Sophia’s Vegetable Garden Is Divided Into 12

Sophia’s Vegetable Garden Is Divided Into 12

Sophia has a rectangular vegetable garden that is divided into twelve equally sized sections. (Note: The instructions for the garden are written on the side of the building, so it’s not quite a rectangle but close enough to count.) Each section is designated to grow one type of vegetable. Sophia knows how much space each type of vegetable needs and also which direction each type needs to face in order to grow best. With this information, she can plant her garden without wasting any space or having any of her plants compete for sunlight!

In Sophia’s vegetable garden, she has 3 types of vegetables.

In Sophia’s vegetable garden, she has 3 types of vegetables. Each type of vegetable takes up a different amount of space and is planted in a different area of the garden.

The first type of vegetable is lettuce, which grows well in cool weather. It takes up 1/2 foot by 1 foot by 1 foot. The second type of vegetable is carrots, which grow well in warm weather and take up 3 feet by 3 feet by 3 feet. The third type of vegetable is broccoli, which needs to be planted directly on top of compost or manure and takes up 6 feet by 6 feet by 6 feet.

One type of vegetable takes up 1/3 of the garden and is planted along the northern wall.

One type of vegetable takes up 1/3 of the garden and is planted along the northern wall. If you plant 10 radishes in one row, how many radishes will you have?

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Radish (R) = 3 feet long x 2 feet wide

How many R units fit into a square foot?

You can use this formula to solve your problem:

R x SF = RSF

If you know that there are 4 rows (RSF), how many radishes do you have in total?

The next type takes up 1/4 of the garden and is planted in the northeast corner.

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The last type in her garden takes up 5/12 and is planted in the eastern part of the garden.

To figure out what type of vegetable this is, you need to know that Sophia’s garden is divided into 12 sections. Each section has a different vegetable planted in it. The first type takes up 1/12 of the garden, so we multiply 5/12 by 12 to get 60/144. Since there are not enough numbers here, we have to round down:

When we add up all the vegetables in her garden, 80% of them are planted on one side! This means that 80% or 6/8 of Sophia’s vegetables will be planted on one side if she continues with this pattern for each type of vegetable!

What other than divisions and fractions can be used to describe a situation such as this one?

You can use other mathematical concepts to describe this situation, in addition to divisions and fractions.

The garden is divided into 12 equal parts; therefore, you can express each part as a percentage of the whole. For example, one part would be 1/12 or 8% of the garden (1 √∑ 12 = 0.08).

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You may also be interested in comparing this situation to another situation by expressing it as a ratio. For example, if you want to compare Sophia’s garden with her brother Michael’s vegetable patch, then you could write:

“Sophia’s Garden Is Divided Into 12 With A Ratio Of 3:4” or “Sophia’s Garden Is Divided Into 12 With A Ratio Of 4:3”

My goal for this blog post was to get you thinking about all of the different ways that fractions can be used in real-life situations. Sophia’s vegetable garden is just one example; I hope you can find others and share them with me.

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